crimesandkillers:

Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr., (November 19, 1904 – August 29, 1971) and Richard Albert Loeb (June 11, 1905 – January 28, 1936), more commonly known as “Leopold and Loeb”, were two wealthy University of Chicago law students who kidnapped and murdered 14-year-old Robert “Bobby” Franks in 1924 in Chicago. The duo was motivated to murder Franks by their desire to commit a perfect crime. 
(Left: Nathan Leopold, Right: Richard Loeb)
crimesandkillers:

Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr., (November 19, 1904 – August 29, 1971) and Richard Albert Loeb (June 11, 1905 – January 28, 1936), more commonly known as “Leopold and Loeb”, were two wealthy University of Chicago law students who kidnapped and murdered 14-year-old Robert “Bobby” Franks in 1924 in Chicago. The duo was motivated to murder Franks by their desire to commit a perfect crime. 
(Left: Nathan Leopold, Right: Richard Loeb)

crimesandkillers:

Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr., (November 19, 1904 – August 29, 1971) and Richard Albert Loeb (June 11, 1905 – January 28, 1936), more commonly known as “Leopold and Loeb”, were two wealthy University of Chicago law students who kidnapped and murdered 14-year-old Robert “Bobby” Franks in 1924 in Chicago. The duo was motivated to murder Franks by their desire to commit a perfect crime. 

(Left: Nathan Leopold, Right: Richard Loeb)

haetmonger:

“[Clarence Darrow’s] almost insane desire is to save life.”

— Erskine Wood, one of Darrow’s closest friends

image

Here’s Clarence Darrow in the Leopold and Loeb trial (the bold emphasis is mine):

Now, I must say a word more and then I will leave this with you where I should have left it long ago. None of us are unmindful of the public; courts are not, and juries are not. We placed our fate in the hands of a trained court, thinking that he would be more mindful and considerate than a jury. I cannot say how people feel. I have stood here for three months as one might stand at the ocean trying to sweep back the tide. I hope the seas are subsiding and the wind is falling and I believe they are, but I wish to make no false pretense to this court. The easy thing and the popular thing to do is to hang my clients. I know it. Men and women who do not think will applaud. The cruel and the thoughtless will approve. It will be easy today; but in Chicago, and reaching out over the length and breadth of the land, more and more fathers and mothers, the humane, the kind and the hopeful, who are gaining an understanding and asking questions not only about these poor boys, but about their own,—these will join in no acclaim at the death of my clients. These would ask that the shedding of blood be stopped, and that the normal feelings of man resume their sway. And as the days and the months and the years go on, they will ask it more and more. But, your Honor, what they shall ask may not count. I know the easy way.

I know your Honor stands between he future and the past. I know the future is with me, and what I stand for here; not merely for the lives of these two unfortunate lads, but for all boys and all girls; for all of the young, and as far as possible, for all of the old. I am pleading for life, understanding, charity, kindness, and the infinite mercy that considers all. I am pleading that we overcome cruelty with kindness and hatred with love. I know the future is on my side. Your Honor stands between the past and the future. You may hang these boys; you may hang them by the neck until they are dead. But in doing it you will turn your face toward the past. In doing it you are making it harder for every other boy who in ignorance and darkness must grope his way through the mazes which only childhood knows. In doing it you will make it harder for unborn children. You may save them and make it easier for every child that some time may stand where these boys stand. You will make it easier for every human being with an aspiration and a vision and a hope and a fate. I am pleading for the future; I am pleading for a time when hatred and cruelty will not control the hearts of men. When we can learn by reason and judgement and understanding and faith that all life is worth saving, and that mercy is the highest attribute of man.

I feel that I should apologize for the length of time I have taken. This case may not be as important as I think it is, and I am sure I do not need to tell this court, or to tell my friends that I would fight just as hard for the poor as for the rich. If I should succeed in saving these boys’ lives and do nothing for the progress of the law, I should feel sad, indeed. If I can succeed, my greatest reward and my greatest hope will be that I have done something for the tens of thousands of other boys, for the countless unfortunates who must tread the same road in blind childhood that these poor boys have trod,—that I have done something to help human understanding, to temper justice with mercy, to overcome hate with love. I was reading last night of the aspiration of the old Persian poet, Omar Khayyam. It appealed to me as the highest that I can vision. I wish it was in my heart, and I wish it was in the hearts of all:

“So I be written in the Book of Love

I do not care about that Book above.

Erase my name or write it as you will,

So I be written in the book of Love.”

iboughtacrackelephant:

Orson Welles as Clarence Darrow in “Compulsion

My essay is on the Leopold and Loeb case of 1924, engrossing enough as it already is i’ve stumbled across its filmic remakes as a source of procrastination. Reading some online review that Orson Welles’ performance as defense attorney Clarence Darrow, who was against the death penalty, was an outstanding, oratory performance.  The review stated that the final scene of Compulsion was brilliant too, so i naturally searched for it. The review was correct. His speech is from the actual transcript of the trial too which is even more transfixing, it supposedly went for just a little over 2 hours IRL.

“They say you can only get justice by shedding the last drop of blood. Do i need to argue with your honour that cruelty only breeds cruelty? Are we crazy? If you hang these boys it will mean that in this land of ours the court of law could not help but to bow down to public opinion.”